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Christian Faith: Opinion or Life?

Conservative-Evangelicals-Misunderstood-MillennialsWhat if Christianity is not primarily about what you believe but about what you live?

What if its not about your opinions but your choices? What if the Final Judgement before God is about how you lived your life, not what religious opinions you espoused — or even what religious experiences you had? What if our actions are more important than our words? What if what God really wants are people — and a community of People — of compassion and patience and peace? What if the most important expression of our faith is not a Doctrinal Statement signed but a life will lived, under the Lordship of Christ? What if the real evidence of faith is “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness,  gentleness, and self-control” (Galatians 5:22, 23)? What if God wants us to be making this world a better place — and we’ve spent our days hiding in our churches?

What if the real scandal of Christianity is the huge gap that lies between our Biblical and theological knowledge and the actual lives that we lead from day to day? (more…)

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Thomas à Kempis: Spiritual Blindness

Thomas à Kempis (c. 1380–1471)

Thomas à Kempis (c. 1380–1471)

“We must not rely too much upon ourselves, for grace and understanding are often lacking in us. We have but little inborn light, and this we quickly lose through negligence. Often we are not aware that we are so blind in heart. Meanwhile we do wrong, and then do worse in excusing it. At times we are moved by passion, and we think it zeal. We take others to task for small mistakes, and overlook greater ones in ourselves. We are quick enough to feel and brood over the things we suffer from others, but we think nothing of how much others suffer from us. If a man would weigh his own deeds fully and rightly, he would find little cause to pass severe judgment on others.

“The interior man puts the care of himself before all other concerns, and he who attends to himself carefully does not find it hard to hold his tongue about others. You will never be devout of heart unless you are thus silent about the affairs of others and pay particular attention to yourself. If you attend wholly to God and yourself, you will be little disturbed by what you see about you.”

— Thomas à Kempis,  The Imitation of Christ Book 2, Chapter 5.

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A Prayer for Today (Thomas à Kempis)

prayer&candleWrite thy blessed name, O Lord, upon my heart
there to remain so indelibly engraved,
that no prosperity, no adversity
shall ever move my from thy love.

Be thou to me a strong tower of defense,
a comforter in tribulation
a deliverer in distress,
a very present help in trouble,
and a guide to heaven
through the many temptations and dangers of this life.

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The Infrastructure of the Wesleyan Revival

John Wesley (1703 –1791) preaching outdoors

John Wesley (1703 –1791) preaching outdoors

The original Methodist revival was a movement intended to produce “real Christians,” that is, Christians who would actually live out the faith they professed. In my opinion: we are in desperate need of such a thing today.

In the Methodist revival, the means used to achieve this goal were:

  1. a message of experienced religion & holiness which drew heavily from the Bible,
  2. large praise and preaching gatherings (the Societies),
  3. small accountability groups (the classes, bands & select societies),
  4. works of service and mercy (generally: addressing the needs of the poor or imprisoned).

This was not intended to produce “Church Growth” or some such thing, it was intended to produce Christians who visibly and noticeably loved God with all their heart, mind, soul and strength and their neighbors as themselves.

What can be learned by this evangelistic & discipleship strategy for our day? (more…)

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Some Thoughts for Holy Week from Thomas à Kempis

Thomas à Kempis (c. 1380–1471)

Thomas à Kempis (c. 1380–1471)

“Bear the Cross cheerfully and it will bear you.”

— Thomas à Kempis, The Imitation of Christ, pt. 2, ch. 12.

“Love feels no burden, regards not labors, strives toward more than it attains, argues not of impossibility, since it believes that it may and can do all things. Therefore it avails for all things, and fulfills and accomplishes much where one not a lover falls and lies helpless.”

— Thomas à Kempis, The Imitation of Christ, pt. 3, ch. 6.

“It is much safer to obey, than to govern.”

— Thomas à Kempis, The Imitation of Christ, pt. 1, ch. 9.

“An humble knowledge of thyself is a surer way to God than a deep search after learning.”

— Thomas à Kempis, The Imitation of Christ, pt. 1, ch. 3.

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Qualifications for Leadership (Thomas á Kempis)

Thomas à Kempis (c. 1380–1471)

Thomas à Kempis (c. 1380–1471)

No man appears in safety before the public eye unless he first relishes obscurity. No man is safe in speaking unless he loves to be silent. No man rules safely unless he is willing to be ruled. No man commands safely unless he has learned well how to obey. No man rejoices safely unless he has within him the testimony of a good conscience.

— Thomas á Kempis, The Imitation of Christ Book 1, Chapter 20.

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