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Ben Witherington on “Rapture Theology”

I have written on the topic of “Rapture Theology” — more properly called Dispensationalism — before. But, in case you doubt my perspective — or want further reinforcement of it — here are some videos from the Asbury Theological Seminary’s Seedbed that discuss this topic.

Dr. Ben Witherington III, a well known conservative New Testament scholar discusses the history of Dispensationalism and it’s interpretation of Scripture. I have included three videos by Dr. Witherington.

Where Did Rapture Theology Come From?


The Rapture in Matthew 24 & 1 Thessalonians 4

And, here is one of related interest:

Who is the Beast of Revelation 13?

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4 Responses to “Ben Witherington on “Rapture Theology””

  1. William says:

    Dr. Witherington says that Rapture theology is a minority position among some Protestants. I agree, as long as we’re talking about the Church worldwide, and throughout history.

    However, I am utterly amazed at how this minority view is the assumed position of most Southern Baptists, mainstream evangelicals, and Pentecostals. Most of Christian television is inundated with this eschatology. My parents are ate up with it. For such people, the four blood moons, the teachings of John Hagee, Jonathan Cahn, Hal Lindsey, Mark Biltz, Jack Van Impe, Joel Rosenberg (even Glenn Beck for the sake of all that is holy!!!), and Obama signing this Iran deal — which is, allegedly, invested as being against Israel — all point to the imminent pre-Tribulational rapture. I’ve almost given up trying to convince my parents of this hokum.

    • Agreed. It is not the minority position in conservative, fundamentalist. and Pentecostal Christian circles. There it is practically an article of faith. And, however many times predictions based on this foolish theory prove false — it never seems to undermine the theory itself. It is discouraging indeed!

      • Mark Bernard says:

        Just because people have made unscriptural predictions concerning events surrounding rapture does not invalidate the teaching itself. It’s like saying I prayed for someone to be healed once and they didn’t get healed therefore there is no such thing as divine healing today. There is more than significant scriptural evidence for a rapture. Now when that rapture comes is a different story.

        • Dispensational theology is the only basis for separating the Rapture aspect of Jesus’ return from other aspects of it. I think a impartial reading of the New Testament, apart from Dispensational assumptions, demonstrates the falsity of this separation. The latter part of the post was an attempt to demonstrate this.

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